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of the appropriations and budget committee. also joined by georgetown university tax law professor john buckley on how the alternative minimum tax is affecting fiscal negotiations. "washington journal" is next. ♪ ♪ host: 25 days to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do n
face the uncertainty that many will face with regard to their taxes. there is no reason that middle income families should go into this holiday season without knowing whether their taxes will go up next year. last year, democrats and republicans work together to cut nearly $1 trillion of spending. now we need to continue that bi- partisan work to cut more spending, and to if congress fails to reach an agreement under the budget control act of 2011, 1.2 trillion dollars in automatic spending cuts will take lace between 2013 and 2021. republicans and democrats agree that indiscriminate across-the- board cuts is not the right and to do at this time in our nation's history. if we trigger the automatic spending cuts and tax increases , grossed a mustard product will fall by half a percentage point -- gross margin bottom will fall by half a percentage point. we will reverse the hard-fought gains over the past few years. we cannot afford to go backwards. instead we need a balanced and bipartisan approach. one that balances the short and long-term needs, distinguishes between foreign invest
, reagan did hold up his end of the deal and went along to support the tax increases. however, it -- on their side of the equation and did not implement the spending cuts, and so, this also happens again under the elder george bush's presidency, so i have very little confidence in democratic leadership's willingness to stand by a pledge to cut any spending at all. host: thanks to all the calls this morning. the house of representatives is about to come into session. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 4, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable gregg harper to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate . the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority a
, your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation and a deal even on the tax and spending and sequester side or both? >> good morning. glad to be with you and give you my perspective on where we are. to the beginning of your question, i often say one i am giving remarks that -- people in the same group, no matter how ponce and they are, people -- no matter how partis and they are, people will say two things. i want you to go to washington and stand on your principal. i want you to fight for us. i say, i will. someone else will get up and say, i want you to compromise and find the middle ground and get things done. this is the 10th time this just happen to me. i say, that is exactly what they hired me to do, to figure out how we do both of those things. it is our job as representatives in congress, to fight for our values and the principles we believe in and still can something done. that is where we are right now. the divide we are facing right now -- i hope all parties understand we have serious challenges. we have created a moment in time with there are major fiscal and
duty increase, freezing tax are raising the personal allowance next year he thinks will be most benefit for the family? >> what i would say to my honorable friend is with have to take some difficult decisions. we've had to take difficult decisions on welfare of bring along tax breschel, operating but i try to help families were can with the personal allowance, with fuel duty. i've tried to help business. it will be extremely welcome. >> how can the chancellor seriously attend he -- [inaudible] when the 7 billion pounds he referred to today we take up to seven years to realize at the rate of 1000 a year against the rate of tax avoidance of 35 billion year? when the general anti-avoidance will be also refer to is far too narrowly drawn to be effective, and if you would listen to this, when he himself is actually now introducing a tax cut, tax havens from 23% to just 5%. >> what i would say is i don't think he's got the right figures. we are increasing the amount recovered of taxes that should have been paid from 13 billion under the labour government to 20 billion. it's an 11 billion poun
, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish between mortgage interest and other kinds of interest. less interest is deductible now. some of the things are left over from the early days of the tax code. there is no magic about allowing people to deduct mortgage interest and not the interest they pay on their credit cards. some of these things are hard to explain. host: does it incentivize home buying? guest: it does provide some if incentive for buying a home and is a large tax break and gives them an enormous benefits. it mostly provides an incentive for buying a bigger house. it seems to incentivize mcmansions. there is a fair question of whether that is something we should be spending that much money on. host: let's go to ohio, robert is a democrat. caller: yes, my question is this. a question/comment. i have seen all these outbreaks been giving out. supposedly they were created for an incentive for them to hire more people. they were given as four years and years. a majority
recommendations in the report create 1.7 million jobs. everyone talks about taxes and what's going to happen with the fiscal cliff. in the last 10 years there's been $1,500 for every american consumer has gone to increased oil prices. $1,500. we're now talking about $2,000 take the tax cuts make a different for middle-class americans. you can get them that tax cut today if you invested in our report. and then everybody talks about entitlements. the social security administration trustees have said that high oil prices make the social security trust insolvent five years sooner than they would if you didn't have high oil prices. look, we all know what america needs. america needs jobs. america needs growth. following the recommendations in our report will lead to both of those. that's going to be good for the politicians, it's going to be good for the consumers, it's going to be good for american business. >> let me bring in the senators here to ask about -- i'll start with you, senator alexander. if you could just tell me a little bit about energy policy in this country and where it fits in i
a factory in china and sell cars. they can delay paying u.s. taxes on that indefinitely. but the money comes from the rent, as so-called passive income, they have to pay taxes on that immediately. this provision says if your a bank -- you can be late paying your taxes. it is going to be considered active income. it is quite valuable to them. it is kind of a gray area. in 1986 when they did big tax reform, they said that is active income and we should tax that money. host: we have been talking with sam goldfarb from cq roll call. thank you very much. >> explores the history and literary culture of all money -- of albany. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially
that we need to repeal this law that tries to set a debt limit and concentrate more on taxing and spending policies that causes to raise the debt, as i understand? >> absolutely. it is a bad way to conduct policy. it is a problem. look at july and august of 2011. it was a mess. gdp downgraded the debt. it really had an impact. cbo is estimating the interest costs is costing us money. it is pretty clear that this is not going to get any better going forward. it will be worse. this is a really bad way of doing things. we need to get rid of this. having said that, we need budget rules. we need to find a way to be credible. the debt ceiling approach is the wrong way of doing it. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator. >> i want to pursue that question a little bit. this is on my mind also. my experience is the political system find it awfully difficult to say no to constituents. with reelection in mind or a natural human tendency to want to please people rather than disappoint them. i had the privilege of meeting with christine lagarde from the imf. i asked about the reforms that we
that by increasing taxes on families, halting employment growth, driving unemployment up instead of down, triggering a deep cuts to programs that families across the country count on. the job before the united states congress is to reach an agreement that builds on the economic progress that we are making, and puts us on a path to fiscal stability. we need to cut more spending, and generate more revenue. we need to do it in a smart way that keeps our economy growing. earlier this year, congress extended the payroll tax cut through 2012. the two percentage point payroll tax cut has played an important role to sustain the recovery. boosting economic growth by an estimated 0.5% of one percentage point, and creating 400,000 jobs. we should continue the payroll tax cut through 2013, and yesterday i introduce legislation that would keep the employee payroll tax at 4.2% next year. to keep the economy growing -- there is good evidence of that in the last couple of months? job growth of about 511,000. to keep that momentum going, we should provide tax credits to small businesses. my legislation includes such
my lips. no new taxes. >> read my lips, no new taxes. george h.w. bush hammered that mantra to win the white house in 1988. but just two years later, the reagan deficits were skyrocketing and president bush was forced to change his most famous line. >> long and bitter battle over the budget officially ended last night. president bush put his signature on the deficit reduction package, including $140 billion in tax increases. >> tax increases. that was a turning point for the modern republican party. the right wing went crazy. and george bush lost re-election. since then the party's been committed to never compromising on the tax issue, no matter the deficit. no congressional republican has voted for an increase in taxes since 1990. think about it. for nearly a quarter of a century, no new income taxes. in the current congress, 236 house republicans vowed never to raise taxes. 40 gop senators also kept that pledge. even president george w. bush, the man who got us into two wars we didn't pay for. the president who exploded our deficit. he insisted the solution to our problems were m
dollar deficits throughout that time. tax policy hasn't changed during that time. tax policy is exactly the same. you hear in the newspaper all the time, mr. speaker, the bush tax cuts. i don't know that that has meaning anymore. in 2001 and 2003 we did do some dramatic changes to tax policy. president obama extended all of those changes in 2010. that's the law of the land still today. tax policy has been exactly the same over this continuum. what has changed, mr. speaker, what has changed is the spending. the reason deficits have grown not one, not two, not three but almost four times larger than the previous record deficit in american history is not because tax policy has changed, it hasn't. it's because federal spending policy has changed. and that's what we have to get our arms around here in this body. what i show going forward, mr. speaker, put a little square around the annual budget deficits that have been run during the first four years of the obama administration, but i also project what the congressional budget office believes, that's a nonpartisan budget planning group we ha
taxes, you know, we don't -- you know we don't agree with that. but fix the problem so if you're asking for somebody to give more of their money into washington, at least be able to tell them that we are going to manage down the debt. that's what we're about here. which is why the focus on spending and how we have to ratchet down the spending in this town. and that's where we've heard no specifics or willingness on the part of the president to engage in discussions about specifics on spending. as far as the math is concerned, again, it was a very different president in the summer of 2011 when he said $1.2 trillion in additional revenues could be accomplished without hiking tax rates. that's what he said. so, again, all of a sudden that math doesn't work but it worked for 1.2 before. regardless, we sort of understand now, at least this round, where everyone is on taxes. let's get to the problem and maybe then we can resolve the taxes question. i yield back. mr. hoyer: well, we have a fundamental disagreement because the gentleman continues to want to focus on spending. i think
. and that's the tax rates for the wealthy. and a key democrat expressing optimism. here's the two side, moving a bit closer together on "fox news sunday." let's listen. >> i think we will get an agreement. the reason i think we will get an agreement. what's standing in the way is revenues, particularly making that top rate go up to 39-6. but i think we are seeing real progress. i think you will see our republican colleague, reluctantly say let's go up to 39-6. >> a lot of people are saying, give the president the 2% increase he's talking about, the rate increase on the top 2%. so there is a growing body. i am beginning to believe that's the best route for us to take. >> reporter: saying, go ahead give the president the tax increase on the highest 2% of wage earners. but house speaker and john boehner have not sat down for negotiations. even though corker is saying there is growing sentiment to accept the president's tax rate on the wealthy, many republican, of course, still adamantly opposed to any tax hike. they could give the peeker a very tough time in the house if that were the ult
the bush tax cuts for the middle class. the latest from stephanie cutter includes a two-minute video reminding voters that the president campaign and won on that same platform. >> obama: we need to give tax relief to working families trying to raise their kids to keep them healthy send them to college, keep a roof over their heads. that's the choice in this election. >> the administration is still asking you to send in stories about what being able to keep about $2,000 more a year means to you and your family. the president is planning to meet with state governors this week and the business roundtable, a big business lobbying group. this morning fiscal cliff negotiations appear to be at a stand still. treasury secretary tim geithner says the president's offer is unwavering. we're going to let tax rates go up for top earners and republicans will have to work with that reality. >> there is no responsible way we can govern this country with those low rates in place for future generations. those rates are going to ha
. tanner? guest: the unemployment tax is generally under 1% even when you include the match that goes into the extended benefits. we're already running in federal debt more than 100% of gdp. once you get over 60% to 70% of gdp, that begins to slow economic growth. we are costing jobs. that is because that money is -- players are looking down the road and saying they're going to have to pay more in the future. we simply cannot afford to spend money, especially we do not have, and still expect to grow fast enough to create the jobs we need to get these folks off of unemployment. host: dotmr. bivens -- mr. bivens? guest: the employer taxes that kicked in are more modest than the previous caller said. i think she had a 15% number. it is an average of $40 a worker. a lot of the states have had to repay. where we disagree is what is holding back the economy. most of the deficit we have today is a symptom of how the economy is and is providing a useful product by injecting demand into the economy, and that is why we are still constrained. host: joseph and is on the democratic line. caller: w
with the middle class maintaining the tax cuts, they are going to be spending money and creating jobs. retail sale s going to go up. to me, it is baffling that the republican ares don't get it. >> we are out of time now. but you stick around and we will talk about something that we will post on or website. and you explain to me your attempts to talk sense to donald trump. he gets tonight's last word the > knives out on the right. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. when a party loses an election, the knives come out. right now we're watching the night of the long knives on the right. these stories breaking tonight. right wing senator jim demint, the man behind too many failed right wing senate challengers, christine "i'm not a witch" o'donnell, richard mourdock announced today he's quitting the senate to run the hard right heritage foundation. meanwhile, in the republican house a purge is under way with speaker boehner dumping uncontrollable right wingers from prize committee assignments. they're out becau
the right solution for solving our issues of middlele class tax cuts and the fiscal deadline and make sure we move in a very positive direction. with that i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from texas. the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, we have no further speakers. i am prepared to return the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman. mr. smith: we have no further speakers on this side. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass bill h.r. 6620. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. smith: mr. speaker, morph that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6602, to make revisions in title 36, uni
of spending and you don't all of a sudden raise taxes to a higher tax rate. i think they would be fine getting rid of some of the loopholes, but if this goes to where it's just higher tax rates on the rich and very little spending cuts, they little reform, i think there will be huge outrage. >> how about a sizable adjustment in entitlements, a big -- billions of dollars in cuts in regular spending, appropriations spending, and a reduction in the rich person's tax rate, a rise to 37% or 38%, would that sell with the right or not? >> i think there's a chance if they would see real reform, real cuts, more than what the president was saying, 2.5 times of cuts for every tax increase, but what they don't want are tax increases now and future cuts. that's not going to work. >> okay. thank you. just want to know what the rules were in the sane world and the insane world. i think it's going to be more like one to one, and i think it's going to be something like i mentioned. let me go back to you, bob. i don't know what it looks like to you. just the other day -- you don't have to talk about the purging
in new taxes, $400 billion in savings from medicare and other entitlement programs, $50 billion in new stimulus spending, and an additional $285 billion to fund depreciation and mortgage programs, unemployment insurance benefits, and payroll tax cuts. >> this extra spending, that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it's -- it was not a serious proposal. >> while his aides were on capitol hill offering up the opening bid, the president was making his case in pennsylvania campaign style. >> at the end of the day a clear majority of americans, democrats, republicans, independents, they agreed with a balanced approach. deficit reduction. >> after the president's remarks, i spoke with his main man on the fiscal cliff, treasury secretary tim geithner. >> let me ask you, the reaction to your going up on the hill and saying this is basically the white house position has been -- mitch mcconnell saying i think it was just demeaning for them to ask the treasury secretary to come up here and give a proposal like this and by this we have people saying it's a sham, it'
grown up in virginia and gone to virginia hools and parents have paid taxes for years and in the process of trying to continue their american experience, we luckily were able to overturn legislation and try to exclude those folks from going to college. but that i think becomes now maybe not a given but it's sure as he can going to be fairly shortly. the chalsleng now going to be because there are these 11 million undocumented persons who work in america trying to sort through some path of legal status for those folks which i think has to be a national priority as well. so that the items of what could have passed before, there's been a size mick shift, people are going to say we need to do more here and not deal with just high scailed or not even just those kids when have lived here for years and give them a path to get an education or serve in our military. but i think we're going to be on that comprehensive. >> better than a 50% chance you have a comprehensive solution? >> i think. so i think there is going to be a subject of a lot of debate and discussion and we're going to need the sc
tax cuts hostage simply because they refuse to let the tax rates go up on the wealthiest americans. >> the republicans call this a bait and switch. >> alisyn: we'll debate. >> dave: one massachusetts town rolling out the welcome mat to long islanders for christmas tree lighting after the they refused to budge on the holiday event. the p.c. please. >> should you tip your garbage collector or how about your child's teacher? we have tips for tipping or the barista at starbucks. >> dave: no! sorry, ladies and gentlemen. >> "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ >> are you supposed to tip the teacher. >> dave: some are, some are not. >> you want to err on the side of tipping and is it too much. do you tip the garbage man or the postal employee. you leave a bunt cake outside. >> alisyn: yes, money. they want money. >> dave: we'll get into it later, but it's tough because it used to be you tip someone for extraordinary service. >> alisyn: right. >> dave: now you just tip someone please. >> alisyn: so they don't egg your house, that's why you're tipping. >> and go to ff weekend and fire it
will never cut a dime in spending. >> why would the democrats want change? if the bush tax cuts are going to expire they are saying this is great because this means the rich are going to pay more money, we are going to have more money to spend. they are already spending a the lo. they are saying why would we want change? this is great we have more money to spend. >> nancy pelosi saying why aren't we voting on middle class tax cuts? get to the other stuff. put this up for a vote: listen to nancy pelosi. we are not here to pass the middle income tax cut why are we here to not deat a time the middle income tax cut. could it be that the republicans are holding the middle income tax cuts as they have all along hostage to tax cuts for the wealthy? >> can i give another analogy? do you mind? it's just crazy, the former speaker of the houses the republicans are holding the middle class hostage. the two sides that come to the bargaining table may want to come to spending cuts on tax increases. think of it you are selling a house. you want to sell your house, the buyer comes in and you say i think
%. but the one thing they are certain is that taxes will increase. and in the next four years how it affected you think the federal government will be on each of the following issues. we read a list of these issues, we rotated those. this is how it basically stacks up. ensuring long-term future of entire programs such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concern
if republicans refuse to raise taxes on the 2%. >> if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans -- remember, it's only 2%. the size of the problem in some sense is so large, it can't be solved without rates going up as part of that. again, i think there's broad recognition of that reality now. >> one fallback option republicans are reportedly considering is to accept tax cuts for the middle class, allow rates to go up for the wealthiest, and then start the fight over again during debt limit talks early next year. yesterday at a business roundtable of ceos, president obama took a hard line, warning his opponents not to consider this strategy. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to dell creting votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i wil
host: maverick writes in and said, i see a problem with giving tax credits for hiring unless employees make a living wage. thomas is up next from south carolina on our democrats line. caller: we are down here in foggy south carolina. thank you for c-span. host: thank you. caller: something that has come to my view on a c-span program the other night, two republicans and one democrat were expressing a need for a trust fund to finance infrastructure, which we need very badly, which would put people back to work from some form of tax on the infrastructure that we build. it is the duty of our government to do things for people that they cannot do themselves. the rich can do for themselves. the poor people cannot. i'll hang up and listen. host: let's go to curtis dubay. guest: we keep hearing about infrastructure investment. but the way we do that is federal gaps. the 65 cents of every dollar raised for the federal gas tax actually goes to roads and bridges and highways. the rest of it goes to things that are not supposed to be funded by the attacks. sustainability projects, bike
. we will get more revenue. and has been going down for the past 20 years. currently as a result of tax cuts and a weak economy. it is the lowest since 1950. to reverse the trend is a major breakthrough. yes, we are talking about deficit deduction. we are talking about raising revenue to a level in which can begin to support the kinds of investments we need to make to train our future work force and to create an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head wi
gitener came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on and had more stimulus spending thanned the in cuts. and an indefinite increase in the debt limit like for ever. now four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there has been no count offer from the white house. instead reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate stradgeji to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we're ready and eager to talk to the president about such a p
in the deadlocked talks to avert the so-called fiscal cliff, the devastating combinations of tax increase and spending cuts that kick in january 1st. both sides seem to dig in this morning on the sunday talk shows. >> the only thing standing in the way of that would be a refusal by republicans that the rates would have to go up on the wealthiest americans, and i don't really see them doing it. >> right now, i would say we're nowhere, period, we're nowhere. >> that somber assessment today from house speaker john boehner, as geithner, the point man, went on all five sunday talk shows, cnbc, washington correspondent aman javers joining me live now. did geithner offer anything new today? >> he really didn't. he thinks the republicans are bluffing here and they are not prepared to go all the way to the mat here on behalf of tax cuts for the rich. they think at the white house they've got their republicans backed into a political corner here, and they are really pressing their advantage hard. you saw this sort of breathtaking offer by the president of the united states last week when he offered
to taxes and financial planning. as soon as word spread -- >> we are crazy about each other and we are going to get married. >> weddings can begin on january 1. along with the vows, couples will enjoy some of the bane -- the same benefits as their heterosexual counterparts have. but when you start talking about financial protection, it gets a little perkier. >> helping them work towards their financial objectives. >> he has been helping gay couples with their financial planning for 15 years. the first thing he tells clients planning to wed is to be careful. >> when people get married at the state level, they get overexcited and think they can file a joint income taxes and merge all of their assets together. >> in order to avoid issues, they recommend same-sex couples meet with an attorney, an accountant and a financial planner to combine their assets when necessary and keeping them separate when necessary. income taxes will be especially complicated. >> oftentimes, when you do -- when you file jointly by the state level, you take information from your federal taxes and put them in
violating his no new tax pledge will be targeted at the primary level by tea party members. i'm taking this masterful behind-the-scenes player at his word that he controls almost all the republicans. because almost all of them signed his oath. so a deal could be tough. plus i'm now calling for no vacation without legislation. no vacation without legislation. because the holidays are slated to begin in a couple of weeks. which doesn't give enough time to get the job done. so you have one side that ins t insisting on tax increases, and then you have the other side which has pledged no tax increases which assure those deal can occur. after all, even if the president offered heavy-duty spending cuts like he did during the debt ceiling fight, the republicans can't compromise because of their blood oath in norquist. they aren't allowed to and the president's bottom line seems to have hardened. doesn't it seem to you like he thinks that the wealthy and those who own stocks are exactly the same? now as far as the public not knowing what awaits us, we've got a whole new school springing up as
tax cuts. >> you have a president of the united states that has the mighty pen. you bailed out the banks. bail out the american people that don't have homes for the holidays. >> in his second term i hope he will offer fresh ideas and serious leadership. >> we need a response from the white house. >> i'm hea here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. >> it's true that president obama won reelection and i congratulate him on his victory, but on january 20th, he'll face a stagnant economy and a fiscal mess. >> our people in an overwhelming way supported the reelection of this president, and there ought to be a quid pro quo and you ought to exercise leadership on that. >> you want the answer to solving the fiscal cliff? we put an offer on the table. the president now has to engage. >> you might even say he'll inherit these problems. >> the president is going away for christmas. he's going to hawaii for 20 something days. where am i going to be? where are my neighbors going to be? we're not going to have a place called home. where is the help? >> what's holdin
closer, to avoid the massive tax increases and budget cuts? not according to house speaker john boehner. >> right now i would say we're nowhere. period. we're nowhere. >> the only thing standing in the way of that would be a refusal by republicans to accept the rates that are going to have to go up on wealthiest americans. i don't really see them doing that. >> nbc news white house correspondent, mike viquiera joining me now. treasury secretary timothy geithner, president obama's point man in these fiscal cliff negotiations, ran the gauntlet this morning. he appeared on all five sunday talk shows, including "meet the press" of course, what else did he say? >> craig, you know if we're in the posturing stage and a lot of people think we're still in the posturing stage with, 29 or 30 days to go. we better hope that they're just posturing, because after the period of optimism, the post-election talk of compromise, you remember john boehner came out the day after the election, the president spoke about compromise as well. they're as far apart as they ever have been and the clock is ticking.
maker? >> it just may mean that republicans ultimately give him close to what he wants on raising tax rates on the top 2%. president obama has been very clear, he was all the way through the campaign that he would not give in on that. so that's i think what's important now. republicans don't like a lot of what was in the white house's opening offer. they dictate the $50 billion stimulus that was in the offer as a slap in the face. some of these little things we'll see taken out of file deal. >> to that point here's john boehner talking about when he saw that opening offer. >> i was flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. i just never seen anything like it. you know, we got seven weeks between election day and the end the year. and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. >> okay. >> it's clear he's not pleased from his ha. is the president in danger of going too far? >> no. i think that everyone is amazed that president obama is pursuing an absolutely normal approach to negotiation. people over the last two years got so accustomed to his strategy
the government point of view, everybody is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. everyone talks about taxes and what is going to happen with the fiscal cliff. there has been $1500 gone to increase oil prices. you can get them that tax cut today if you invested in our report. everybody talks about entitlements. high oil prices make the social security trust insolvent five years sooner than they would if he did not have high oil prices. america needs jobs and growth. following the recommendations in our report will lead to both of those. it would be good for american business. >> i will start with senator alexander. tell me about energy policy and where it fits in with the fiscal cliff. what we will spend money on and how we were tightened our belts. >> the major place it fits is the right policy would create an environment which would produce a lot more revenue. that would help to reduce the debt. the federal government doesn't spend much money on energy. energy research is about $6 billion a year. i would like to see it doubled. this report is a blueprint for independence and i think it is
away? they sent her a tax bill for $300,000. they wouldn't do that to you and your wonderful wife, and they wouldn't do that to other straight couples in this country. it's not fair. >> let's go to -- let's get revolutionary. we only have a few minutes. wonder looking at justice kennedy, maybe because he's irish, i'm just kidding, there's something about him i find very interesting. >> and from california. >> he's from california. if you look at the majority opinion in the case involving lawrence versus texas which was about outlawing or basically declaring sodomy -- anti-sodomy laws unconstitutional, he says not only in that court decision you can't deny a person's liberty in these cases to engage in intimate conduct but it's about something bigger. marriage is not about having constant sex, it's about having a loving relationship. it's about people. >> right. >> not organs. let me -- >> it's about families. >> okay. you tell it your way. if it gets down to questions of liberty and equal protection of the law, fundamental things that they developed in philadelphia in the old days
a doomsday scenario in the event that republicans have to compromise on tax rates. on monday, abc's jonathan carl explained how it worked. he said "republicans are seriously considering a doomsday plan if fiscal cliff talks collapse entirely. it would be quite simple. house republicans would allow a vote on extending the bush middle class tax cuts. that bill already passed in august in the senate. and offer the president nothing more. no extension to the debt ceiling, nothing on unemployment, nothing on loopholes. congress would recess for the holidays and the president would face a big battle early in the year over the debt ceiling. ." two republican officials tell me this is becoming the most likely scenario. "the new york times" added more detail including this amazing quote from rep michael c. burgess of texas. "there's always better ground, but we have to get there." in this case the better ground is exchanging the threat of a congressionally induced recession for the threat of a congressionally induced global financial crisis combined with recession. that, that is your better ground? t
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